Brief

Google Hire controversy reveals growing questions over transparency in recruiting tech

Dive Brief:

  • Google Hire raised eyebrows across the internet when rumors said the tool, aimed at recruiters, could reveal applicant browser search histories, says the Recruiting Times
  • Turns out it doesn't work quite like that. "Only information that a candidate voluntarily provides would be passed to a prospective employer as part of their online application. Private information will not be shared," a Google spokesperson told Gizmodo. It can't be done "accidentally" either, as the information requested by Hire is largely what any application system would ask for, according to the search giant.
  • In testing currently, Hire aims to make searching for a job easier as it will enable job seekers to pre-populate some of their information based on their social media profiles, including YouTube channels. 

Dive Insight:

While this controversy ended up being largely false, it does point out the growth of data available online. The internet has made the world increasingly transparent, and that transparency has transformed how recruiters approach their jobs.

Candidates are increasingly turning the tables on employers by examining public reviews of organizations before applying. A slew of bad reviews could lead to serious brand damage, especially if an employer does little to fix the problem.

The power and breadth of recruiting tools will only increase as the technology improves. But that means employers will also have to increase their attention to unintentional bias present within recruitment generally. Even AI-powered algorithms can contain bias, as they are based on human-built processes and intention.

To combat the potential dangers of such technology, recruitment leaders will need to ensure they have policies in place to fairly approach all candidates, perhaps starting with job ad language and application requirements.

More simply: Fabulous technology is coming. But the humanness of your recruiting process will still be key.

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Filed Under: Recruiting
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